Menu

Category Archives: CSS

SVG Clipping Path Examples

Excerpt of the ori­gin­al art­icle.

«Last week I walked through a few examples using the path ele­ment and the text ele­ment as clip­ping paths. I also showed you how to clip ele­ments inside a group as opposed to indi­vidu­ally. Today I want to con­tin­ue with more examples start­ing with one where we’ll use a vari­ety of SVG ele­ments to build up a more com­plex clip­ping path.»

Read more on

→ vanseodesign.com

Advanced CSS tricks and techniques

Excerpt of the ori­gin­al art­icle.

«As time goes by, CSS is becom­ing more and more power­ful and nowadays it allows a lot of pos­sib­il­it­ies. This art­icle is a com­pil­a­tion of fresh, advanced tips and tech­niques to mas­ter your CSS skills.»

Read more on

→ catswhocode.com

Web Image Effects Performance Showdown

Excerpt of the ori­gin­al art­icle.

«As browsers con­stantly improve their graph­ic­al ren­der­ing abil­it­ies, the abil­ity to truly design with­in them is becom­ing more of a real­ity. A few lines of code can now have quick and dra­mat­ic visu­al impact, and allow for con­sist­ency without a lot of effort. And as with most things in web devel­op­ment, there are often many ways to achieve the same effect.»

Read more on

→ mashingmagazine.com

Web design: Fluid Typography

Excerpt of the ori­gin­al art­icle.

«Embra­cing flu­id typo­graphy might be easi­er than you think. It has wide browser sup­port, is simple to imple­ment and can be achieved without los­ing con­trol over many import­ant aspects of design. Unlike respons­ive typo­graphy, which changes only at set break­points, flu­id typo­graphy res­izes smoothly to match any device width. It is an intu­it­ive option for a web in which we have a prac­tic­ally infin­ite num­ber of screen sizes to sup­port.»

Read more on

→ smashingmagazine.com

CSS from the Future

Excerpt of the ori­gin­al art­icle.

«One of the hard­est things about being a web developer is accept­ing the fact that many of the people vis­it­ing your site are using old and under­powered web browsers. New fea­tures are added to web browsers all the time, but you gen­er­ally can’t use those fea­tures, unless you’re will­ing to exclude lots of users who just aren’t up to date.»

Read more on

→ zeke.sikelianos.com

Meaningful CSS: Style Like You Mean It

Excerpt of the ori­gin­al art­icle.

«These days, we have a world of mean­ing­ful markup at our fin­ger­tips. HTML5 intro­duced a lav­ish new set of semantic­ally mean­ing­ful ele­ments and attrib­utes, ARIA defined an entire addi­tion­al plat­form to describe a rich inter­net, and micro­formats stepped in to provide still more stand­ard­ized, nuanced con­cepts. It’s a golden age for rich, mean­ing­ful markup.»

Read more on

→ alistapart.com

An Ultimate Guide To CSS Pseudo-Classes And Pseudo-Elements

Excerpt of the ori­gin­al art­icle.

«Hola a todos! (Hello, every­one!) In my early days of web design, I had to learn things the hard way: tri­al and error. There was no Smash­ing Magazine, Can I Use, Code­Pen or any of the oth­er amaz­ing tools at our dis­pos­al today. Hav­ing someone show me the ropes of web design, espe­cially on the CSS front, would have been incred­ibly help­ful.»

Read more on

→ smashingmagazine.com

2016 CSS Development

Excerpt of the ori­gin­al art­icle.

«For some, it’s a won­der­fully flex­ible present­a­tion­al tech­no­logy that they love bend­ing to their will. For oth­ers, it’s a near incom­pre­hens­ible series of fractal lay­out hacks that make accom­plish­ing some­thing as simple as ver­tic­ally cen­ter­ing an ele­ment a cause for cel­eb­ra­tion.»

Read more on

→ kriesi.at

30 Tools That No Designer Should Live Without

Excerpt of the ori­gin­al art­icle.

«Design­ers are extremely busy people. Fact. Not only do they have to make time to find inspir­a­tion for their next pro­ject, man­age feed­back, attend meet­ings, and com­mu­nic­ate with their cli­ents, they also have to loc­ate the time to actu­ally sit down and do the work.»

Read more on

→ speckyboy.com

20 Small, Yet Viable Solutions Based on Flexbox

Excerpt of the ori­gin­al art­icle.

«Flexbox lay­out is per­haps one of the most long-awaited fea­tures in CSS. It is the “talk of the town.” It is suit­able for tab­let and mobile applic­a­tions and small-scale lay­outs, how­ever, its enorm­ous poten­tial allows it to deal with all sorts of pro­jects, includ­ing large-scale ones.»

Read more on

→ designmodo.com